Now You See Me

Vision is the main sense that is manipulated. Knowing these words and what they mean is necessary to understand the synopsis in Now You See Me. Keywords: illusions, magic, vision, perception, deceptive devices Diagnosis and Discussion of Illusions Introduction Now You See Me is an amusing film featuring several amazing actors. Dave Franco, Jesse Ginsberg, Mark Ruffle, Woody Harrison, Islam Fisher and Morgan Freeman were all included in this monumental film. It all starts with four cards that have a special meaning and when all put together, they create had known as “The Eye. The four magicians call themselves the Four Horsemen. They are given instructions from an unknown source and they perform a heist at their first big show. This obviously grabs the attention of the FBI and now they are having to perform their magic while staying one step in front of the authorities. Now You See Me is all about illusions to achieve “magic”, and illusions are covered in the Intro to Psychology course here at Tiffin University. Basic psychological points were prevalent throughout the film. These points include illusions, magic, perception, deceptive devices and vision.

According o an online journal, illusion is defined as misconceptions that are perceived by most people, and are based on a specific stimulus received under certain conditions (Block). Is magic real? Magic is defined in the Merriam-Webster dictionary as, “a power that allows people to do impossible things by saying special words or performing special actions. ” less also, more realistically, described as, “the art of producing illusions by sleight of hand. ” In the textbook, Psychology De. 10, perception is defined as, “the processes by which an individual’s brain organizes and interprets sensory input (Myers 218). Dictionary. Mom defined vision as, “the act or power of sensing with the eyes. ” A major contributor to illusions are the deceptive devices that are used. Deceptive devices are simply the props and things that magicians use to deceive and manipulate their audience’s minds. Now You See Me is the perfect film to display the effects illusions have on the mind that people and deceptive devices can create. The first few scenes are used to display each of the four magicians’ area of expertise. Daniel (Jesse Ginsberg) is the first one to be shown as he says, “Come in close. Closer.

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Because the more you think you see, the easier it will e to fool you. Because what is seeing? You’re looking but what you’re really doing is filtering, interpreting searching for meaning. My job: to take that most precious of gifts you give me – your attention – and use it against you. ” This quote goes hand in hand with the concept of retinal disparity. Now retinal disparity is a binocular cue for perceiving depth: by comparing images from the retinas in the two eyes, the brain computes distance-?the greater the disparity (difference) between the two images, the closer the object (Myers 237).

Now he is saying it more figuratively because he’s never actually hat close to your face however when your brain becomes so focused on one thing you begin to lose sight of what’s really happening, which is what makes his “magic” possible. Daniel is shown doing a card trick that ends with the young woman’s card on the side of the John Hancock Center building, which he later admits he just bribed the building’s maintenance guy. He gave his street audience the illusion that he controlled the whole situation. Daniel and the young woman end up in his apartment later that day.

She charms him into sex, however, he is distracted by the “Lovers” tarot card that is right in his nine of sight shoved in some books. The next one is a street mentalist and hypnotist named Merritt McKinney (Woody Harrison). He is shown manipulating a married man into giving him $250. He does this by hypnotize the wife so she cannot move nor speak, then proceeds to get into the husband’s head using his mind-reading skill and exposes the fact that he’s sleeping with his wife’s sister. The man then pays him to keep his mouth shut and McKinney then hypnotizes them both into forgetting the whole situation.

He notices the “Hermit” tarot card in his pile of posters. The third street reformer is Jack Wilder (Dave Franco). He is a con artist and lures spectators in by betting them money if they can figure out how he bends a spoon with his mind. When one guesses correctly he pays his money but while doing so, pickpockets the man’s wallet. How? The man was too focused on the hand that was paying him which is an illusion in and of itself. While fleeing, Wielder’s tarot card, the “Death” card, was slipped into his pocket. The fourth and final horseman is a young woman named Henley Reeves (Islam Fisher).

She is a trained stage performer and we see her in a water tank escape act. After the CT, she is packing up the set and her things and finds the “High Priestess” tarot card floating in the tank. On the back of all the cards there is an address located in the Lower East Side of New York City. When all four street performers arrive at the apartment, no one is inside and Wilder has to pick the lock. Once inside they find blueprints to amazing machinery they all know will help them reach their full star potential. At this point the source of the cards is unknown to the viewers and to the four undiscovered magicians.

Later, it comes out that they came from a man in a black hooded sweatshirt in ACH scene whose face was never shown. About a year after they began working together, they have declared themselves the Four Horsemen and are sponsored by an insurance magnate Arthur Trestles (Michael Canine). Performing at the MGM Grand in Lass Vegas for their first show is kind of ironic because their stage can be seen as a giant eye, which is what they’re trying to get into, “The Eye. ” The stage looking like an eye can be referred to as “figure-ground. Figure-ground concept is the organization of the visual field into objects that stand out from their surroundings, so the stage would be the objects that stand out from the round (Myers 235). They decide to go out with a bang and try something that’s never been done before. They rob a bank. When they ask what bank, there are several volunteers. Daniel tells the audience it will all be “at random. ” They pull ping pong balls out of bowls to choose the seat, BIBB. A Frenchman named Tontine Fortier stands up. They have him sign his name on a playing card and fit him with a teleporting helmet.

He then steps into the teleprompter that’s in the middle of the stage. It seems he was successfully transported offstage and is in Paris at 8:AMA. The built in cameras on the Elmer are activated; the audience sees him drop the card with his signature on It in the middle of the stacks of euros and then, as instructed by Daniel, push a button on the side of the helmet. This activates an air duct that sucks up all the money which then showers upon the entire Lass Vegas audience. In Paris, the bankers open the vault to see the money gone and the playing card the only thing left.

This is when the FBI agent, Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffle) is called in. They take the Four Horsemen in to begin an interrogation. None seem to be too nervous. They know that with the only explanation for the heft being “magic,” they can be arrested because that would mean that magic was real and the FBI can’t go off of that. Agent Rhodes then begins to involve an ex-magician named Thatched Bradley (Morgan Freeman) who makes money by revealing magicians’ tricks. Bradley then explains how the Horsemen pulled this off while simultaneously making Rhodes look like an idiot. How did they do it?

Easy, they had a whole replica of the bank under the stage set up and when he was “transported” to Paris, he really just fell below into the replica. How did they know what bank? The Frenchman was not “randomly selected,” he was chosen. The Four Horsemen studied him for quite a while, got his credit card information and then found his bank. Then pulled the fixed ping pong balls out of their sleeves to give the illusion it was the audience choosing him. The money? They stole the money weeks before form and replaced it with flash paper money. They manipulated the audience into thinking it all happened in real time.

The deceptive devices they used would be the “teleprompter” and everything else I just explained that was fake and deceiving. No information was given on how they got the teleprompter to look like it shut from the bottom as well without killing the Frenchman; forever think a possibility would be the phi phenomenon. The phi phenomenon is an illusion of movement created when two or more adjacent lights blink on and off in quick succession (Myers 239). Their next act takes place in New Orleans, a sold out show. At this show, they explain one of the most famous illusions known in the magic world, mirrors.

They show how if you manipulate the mirror and put it at the correct angle, you can easily hide the “disappearing” rabbit or what have you. The angle of incidence needs to be equal to the angle of reflection for a plane mirror (Tutorial). Following the explanation of the well-known magic trick, they move on to original stunts. Merritt hypnotizes a dozen ordinary people to think they’re football players ready to tackle when they hear the trigger word. The finale for this show is emptying their sponsor’s bank account in order to reimburse members of the audience whose insurance claims had been denied or reduced by his company.

How could they possibly get away with this without magic? Easy, on the plane ride to the show, Arthur told them the answers they needed to know without a second thought. Daniel and Merritt staged a little argument that mind-reading is all well thought out questioning and coincidence and that anyone could do it. Since Arthur is the only one he doesn’t know, Daniel tried on him and cleverly pulled out his first pet, and his father’s name. He did this without giving any sort of tip-off, or maybe Arthur is just too narcissistic, or self-loving (Myers 548), thinking that everyone just wants to know a little bit more about his lavish childhood.

The Four Horsemen make it out of this act unscathed because they knew Agent Rhodes was in the audience and also, they knew once their act was over and they stole Urethra’s money, he would yell, “freeze! Well, “freeze” was also the trigger word for the hypnotized and they tackle him to the ground buying the horsemen enough time to exit fashionably. Another illusion the magicians pull off would be convincing the police they’re chasing Daniel down when in reality, they slipped the tracker onto Agent Rhodes and only when he traps “Daniel” in a bathroom does he realize he’s been tracking himself the whole time.

This is more of a deception than an illusion but it provided the illusion of finally capturing the ring leader. This is when the police hear word of the old secret society called “The Eye. ” They were known for their dependence on illusions and great leaps of faith or even blind obedience. Agent Rhodes knows that Thatched knows about The Eye and he hires him to expose the horsemen. The final performance is to be in New York City and they are still following the unknown benefactor but are getting nervous that this benefactor will abandon them to the police once its dirty work is done.

Wilder was left alone to fight off two agents, which he accomplishes but then the biggest illusion yet comes into play, They fake his death. In his escape, he steals a car but not just any car, a car they already have a car of the same make and model in a truck. Wilder manipulates traffic and in the split second the police lose him, the others are waiting in the truck next to him to drop the same model car with a stolen cadaver body inside, which then loses control and crashes and explodes. Everyone thinks he’s dead. Its an example of a ritual sacrifice played out on a mass scale by the occult elite (Vigilantism’s. Com).

In the burning car, police found papers Wilder had “tried to destroy,” which were planted in the stunt car; the benefactor wanted the police to know that the horseman’s next step was to target a specific safe that was located under FBI surveillance. Agents rush to the cafe’s location only to find the room empty. They soon discover that another agent was hypnotized to give instructions for the safe to be moved. However, the safe they’re chasing is just a fake one filled with balloons. Once performance time comes, despite Agent Rhodes’ effort, the three escape by using holograms, dummies, and even jumping off a rooftop.

The holograms make it look like they vanish into thin air and their bodies turn into fake money, which assume was just blown out of a fan of some sort and then showered upon the crowd. The final performance is also serving as a diversion so that the final task the inflector has given them can be done. Wilder, who everyone still thinks is dead, is back at the location of the safe. In this scene he throws a sledgehammer and the next thingy know, there’s a huge mirror shattering and you see the real safe. This is the illusion they literally explained to the FBI in their second show.

This is simply foreshadowing at its finest. The next scene shows Thatched unlocking his car to find all the real money from the safe spilling out his doors. FBI then comes to arrest him. He tells Rhodes he’s been framed and explains everything, but Rhodes already knows. Rhodes was the fifth horseman. He then goes to meet with the other four to initiate them into “The Eye. ” Later it explains why he concocted this whole plot and it goes back to family issues that were caused by Thatched when he was famous. Nobody expected the benefactor to be the agent that had been chasing them, and had everyone fooled the entire time.