letting go

By coming parents in a devastated world, we also develop an innate sense of love that cannot be destroyed. We will try to show that even if the author is right, the dangers of our society cannot be compared to previous one. And by making sure our children are as safe as they could be, we keep the hope that we are in control of their education and future at least. In “Letting go”, Sam Salesman states that parents use too much control over their children by not letting them grow as the responsible adults they crave to be, by monitoring their every move. O agree with the author that we overprotect our children ore than ever before, certainly because we cannot look at our new generations and compare them to the care-free children in a care-free world, as it was after the World War II. Unconditional love is what makes parents worry so much. By accepting to be understanding friends instead of parents, and by using candor over rigidity, we are failing our children. Also, we all promised not to be as our parents, the guidance for our children should be stricter.

Discipline in the USA is a constant fear. Child protective services are called if a child complains of his parents. Early in school, children are taught o dial 9-1-1 if parents to discipline them. Of course, I do not mean to correct with abuse but to do so to teach them right from wrong. Furthermore, we need to look at the statistics in today’s world. Child trafficking cannot be compared to anytime in the century. The horror of what happens in a split second of inadvertence is also what motivates parents to act as guardians or private “body-guards”.

Constant fear of the unknown set by the media do not allow parent’s mind to rest, we are polluted by violence and crimes in the most vulnerably uncommon places. For example, the mass shooting in our schools or movie theatres leave such an impact on us that we run to buy cellular phones or bulletproof backpacks for our children, as early as by age 6. Do believe that public derangement from different sources does not allow parents to feel safe and protected.

Obviously by losing control Of their own safety, they do realize they would be helpless in some circumstances. The terrorist attacks against the American soil in 2001 created an overwhelming sense of despair and emptiness, and we came do admit that our lives do not only depend on us but are at the mercy of any abomination. By using social ideas and other means of communication as cellular phones, we keep in constant contact with our children to pretend to be in control of what could happen to them, and also pretending to have a sense of safety.

Our society is so fearful of a chemical attack, the end of the world and perhaps another world’s war that parents need to make sure to preserve their heirs. We are so afraid of the “here” and “now” that parents rely in the fake proximity created by constant monitoring. In addition, since the financial crisis of 2008, young adults in he USA moved back With their parents because they cannot afford to arrive out of the parental nest after college. Even more troubling, those young adults stay longer under their parents’ care.

In mid-century, such grown children would be considered a failure but certainly not in today’s society. Parents will rather let their children come back home rather than let them be an easy pray for unscrupulous people. In fact, reality television and other shameful scams try to lure our kids with fame and money. Our society has come to a point of desperate attention, and, if not monitored, television and internet can become a parent’s worst nightmare. Perverted voyeurism is part of an elaborate system.