Individuality and Community

They have the option to act beyond expectations just like Jonathan Swift addressed n “A Modest Proposal”. Being independent is an adult’s freedom. Parents are a great power over young adults. They often expect their sons/ daughters to grow up as they see fit. This may include parents expecting their child to follow w the same career path or only go to a college that they approve of, despite opposite ion. Such situations are similar to what Sherman Alexei observed from the Indian child en in “Superman and Me”.

The children were expected to act stupid and helpless al though the children acted intelligently outside of the classroom. They lived up to thou expectations… But subverted them on the outside” (Alexei) The same could b e said for young adults who conform to their parent’s wishes, despite their personal into rests outside of the home. Young adults can decide who they want to be, even if their parents may believe e they are too inexperienced to make good decisions. This is the same as how Alexei act deed intelligently despite the ridicule from his Indian peers in “Superman and Me”.

He refused to give in to negative expectations, gained knowledge instead, and eventually became a Ritter, even though “writing was something beyond Indians” (Alexei). Even if a parent wants his/ her daughter to inherit a restaurant owner position, she can still aim to become a doctor if she wishes to. Even if a parent believes his/ her son is not competent enough to become a teacher, he can aim for a bachelor degree in education t o prove them wrong. The young adults needs to act on his/ her individual wishes accordingly and communicate it clearly. In reality, young adults can aim for any career pat h that they wish.

Some parents feel that their sons/ gutters going into adulthood are unable to branch off from the house and become independent To an extent, parents may feel t heir child is useless without them. They may assume the outside world is still too harsh for their son/ daughter, even as a young adult. This is similar to the opinion of the English t o the Irish as addressed in “A Modest Proposal”. The Irish that were dominated by t he English were just considered to be breeders, only good for making children. T his is similar to parents who label their offspring as dependent and unreliable.

Des bite sis proving parents, just going to college in itself is already an act of indeed indecent. Choosing to work is already an act of self sufficiency. Young adults can still act intelligently even beyond their parent’s expectations. Still, it can be overwhelming for a young adult to gain so much responsibility a ND freedom at the same time. Many young adults either go to work, go to school, live on their own, or perform a combination of these feats. Peers, not just parents, m ay assume young adults will act immaturely or helplessly in these situations, even if they o not see the whole picture.

This is similar to the Irish assuming the role of being help as, poor citizens to the English, with their children exaggeratedly referred to as food in Modest Proposal” (Swift). “First ask the [citizens] whether they would not at the is day think it is a great happiness to have been sold for food and thereby have VA iodide… Misfortunes” (Swift). If peers care to make expectations of young adults in this day and age, they should first ask the young adults, instead of believing they cannot h alp themselves. Young adults do not need to sit down and be limited by their peers’ expectant ones.